Why Social Distancing Matters



One way to slow the spread of viruses is social distancing. There are practical things you can do, to protect those more susceptible to the virus.


Households


  • Practice good hand and cough/sneeze hygiene

  • Avoid handshaking and other physical greetings

  • Regularly clean shared high-touch surfaces, such as tables, kitchen benches and doorknobs Increase the amount of fresh air by opening windows or adjusting air conditioning

  • Buy more goods and services online so you limit visits to the shop

  • Consider what travel and outings are necessary, both individual and family, and go to open places such as parks


Social distancing in the workplace


To reduce the spread of germs in the workplace:


  • Stay at home if you are sick

  • Consider if large gatherings can be rescheduled, staggered or cancelled

  • Stop handshaking and other physical greetings

  • Hold meetings via video conferencing or phone call

  • Reconsider non-essential business travel

  • Defer large face-to-face meetings

  • Hold essential meetings outside in the open air if possible

  • Promote good hand and cough/sneeze hygiene and provide hand sanitisers for all staff and workers

  • Take lunch outside rather than in the lunch room

  • Clean and disinfect shared high-touch surfaces regularly

  • Consider opening windows and adjusting air conditioning for more fresh air Limit food handling and shared food in the workplace

  • Promote strictest hygiene among food preparation (canteen) staff and their close contacts


Social distancing in schools


To reduce the spread of germs or viruses in schools:


  • If your child is sick, do not send them to school (or childcare)

  • Clean hands when entering school and at regular intervals

  • Defer activities that lead to mixing between classes and years

  • Avoid queuing, handholding and assemblies

  • Promote a regular handwashing schedule

  • Clean and disinfect shared high-touch surfaces regularly

  • Conduct lessons outdoors where possible

  • Consider opening windows and adjusting conditioning for more fresh air

  • Promote strictest hygiene among food preparation (canteen) staff and their close contacts


Who is most at risk


In Australia, the people most at risk of getting the virus are those who have:

recently been in in a high risk country or region (mainland China, Iran, Italy or Korea) been in close contact with someone who has a confirmed case of COVID-19


Based on what we know about coronaviruses, those most at risk of serious infection are:

people with compromised immune systems (such as people who have cancer) elderly people Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples (as they have higher rates of chronic illness) people with chronic medical conditions people in group residential settings people in detention facilities


How it spreads


The virus can spread from person to person through:


  • Close contact with an infectious person (including in the 24 hours before they started showing symptoms)

  • Contact with droplets from an infected person’s cough or sneeze touching objects or surfaces (like doorknobs or tables)

  • That have cough or sneeze droplets from an infected person, and then touching your mouth or face

To learn more about social distancing and avoiding public gatherings and visits to vulnerable groups, please visit the Department of Health's website below:

https://www.health.gov.au/news/health-alerts/novel-coronavirus-2019-ncov-health-alert

#COVID19



Rural Lifestyle Options Australia